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20121202
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don't think that war ever technically ended. and superstorm sandy brought devastated and will cost tens of billions of dollars and now the president is asking congress for 60 billion to help with the cleanup. peter doocy is live in washington with the latest on the recovery efforts. >> reporter: good morning, clayton, you're right the white house wrote a letter, the speaker of the house, to request 64.4 billion dollars and the number recommends funds needed to finance a recovery effort and help the region prepare for future challenges, including future severe storms and flooding as well as impacts associated with a changing climate. just because the white house is requesting 60.4 billion dollars doesn't necessarily mean it will be easily approved by the house of representatives, because money is tight right now and as spokeman for speaker boehner says simply, we have the request and we will review it. four u.s. senators from new york and new jersey, chuck schumer robert menendez and kirsten gillibrand says the money might get caught up with people wanting it elsewhere. and it's a
to address the devastating impact that super-storm sandy had a run -- had on our regional transportation, the most widely new transportation network and unprecedented damage to our system and estimates of the damage have reached more than an $7 billion. across the regent, a train tunnels, stations, railyards all flooded with critical equipment ruined and some of that equipment, unfortunately, was barely know -- fairly new. these pieces of equipment have been rendered almost useless. we seem an almost incomprehensible of damage in this picture. a boat dragged across the new jersey transit tracks. roads and bridges were damaged, left littered with debris. the holland tunnel, a major commuter route facility, carries thousands of vehicles every day in new york city-owned it was flooded. the damage to our infrastructure did not just cause structural problems but it shut down a region. for many commuters, getting to work became a much longer, hardy was, and expensive experience. you can see why, from this picture at the hoboken have station. it's hard to believe the water was 6 feet high -- at
not only because of the election, maybe firms sitting on their hands but superstorm sandy. still, guys, the number much better than expected. few tuesday, which were down right before the numbers hit, turned around. they are now higher fractionally so a big turn for stock futures and better than expected jobs number for november. i can dig in more once i get to the website. but those are your headline numbers. better than expected. >> gillian, better than expected. a lot of people blamed hurricane sandy again but that's encouraging. >> i have two economists, a liberal, who both said it was going to be somewhere between 80,000 and 100,000 jobs -- say that go sandy was worth 80 -- negatively 80,000 to 100,000. you take 146,000 and this could have been a 200-plus number. >> it's interesting because it ties in with consumer data we've been seeing which actually, you know, is not great. it's not buoyant, but it's not bad. and you look at the fact what american households have been doing recently with debt and the degree of debt they've been repaying, sort of deleveraging. you add it togethe
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3